Adrenaline, an immersive film about cross-bitumen and more, by Nadir Ioulain

With “L’Adrenaline”, Nadir Ioulain is the author of an immersive feature film that, thanks to virtual reality, immerses us in the (dangerous) passion for urban rodeos in working-class neighborhoods. A damn original production, which he chose to introduce to the young people in Trappes during the month of April. Saphirnews tells you.





© Nadir Ioulain
© Nadir Ioulain

© Nadir Ioulain

No preview. No invitation card. Friday the 29th of April we go ashore to see his movie The adrenaline rush of a whim after hanging on to a completely different topic with director Nadir Ioulain, author of native French and of Jungle Jihad. It must be said that while chatting with him, while scrolling on his Facebook profile, the pictures he publishes are intriguing: toddlers as tall as three apples, whose heads are shifted in all directions … This is the case with him . Say, it’s a mouthful.

We decide to see with our own eyes. But the journey from Carrefour Pleyel in Saint-Denis to the town of Mérisiers in Trappes is so difficult that it reminds us of the movie exile by Tony Gatlif, with Romain Duris and Lubna Azabal. We get lost in the meanders of the interconnections of inter-suburban trains, trams and peripheral buses, which throw us very close to a shopping mall where the small shops are in Ramadan colors. It’s getting hot, but it’s not quite the place yet. Fortunately, Google Maps comes to the rescue and leads us patiently but surely to the small entertainment tent in the middle of the HLM bars. There is another animation, the greater, devoted to road safety. There are also quite a few decibels.

Without pretense, Nadir Ioulain is a director that Saphirnews greatly appreciates. Because he’s our national Spike Lee. A real enthusiast in what he does. A bit like us. When we say this, we deviate from the decency of modesty. None “mumu attitude” between us, right? This enthusiast often works with very spartan means, but without ever compromising on quality. A real bitumen seed. After the usual hugs that follow after long absences, he puts the Quest helmet on my head and we go.


A motorcycle noise that hypnotizes us

“Brouuuuh, brouuuuh, brouuuuh! » We open our eyes and find ourselves in the same situation as Alice falls into the white rabbit hole. No blue pill, no red pill, but really disoriented by lively music that throws us into a kind of docu-fiction where we tell ourselves that Thierry Ardisson, the man dressed in black, is never far away. Not easy to rinse it out in a 360 ° environment.

A categorical anti-motorcycle mother, whom we can immediately see we can not do upside down, warns: “Me, if I see my son on a motorcycle, then I’m going to bite him very, very hard.” Followed by an excellent intellectual type girl from the neighborhood in possession of fashion Gilles Deleuze and Roland Barthes, who explains to you the daring parallel between Zola’s astonishing and wild rodeos.

To our great surprise, we are mesmerized by this motorcycle noise. Fantastic effect Madeleine Proust. “Brouuuuh, brouuuuh, brouuuuh! » Flashback 30 years ago, where we hear the same noise from a motorcycle on the playground at Pierre and Marie Curie College in Dreux. “Brouuuuh, brouuuuh, brouuuuh! » Jacques Pradel, not the TV host of Perdu de vu, but the maths teacher who somehow explains the concept of parallel lines to children distracted by “Brouuuuh, brouuuuh, brouuuuh! » by their friend Aziz, who skips class and enjoys driving around the playground under the windows of National Education teachers doing their best. Meanwhile, the guy offers us a pre-lesson in kinetic energy.

Obviously, we’ve completely forgotten about the immersive reality headset, but it’s not easy to dry out the watery eyes glued to Quest ‘lenses. The virtual reality film evokes our own memories while mobilizing different fantasies. We feel the adrenaline rise. We taste the “kiffance” of these children.


When the paths between fiction, documentary and learning history cross each other

By watching the 45-minute-long work, however, we do not forget the many deaths in the cities of improvised pilots, but above all the innocent children mowed down by the wheels of these big cars. Immersive reality is also articulated with a complex situation. One can only understand the tiredness of the law enforcement forces that the director stages through the characters of the police officers caught in the cat and mouse game.

Like Emile Zola, Nadir Ioulain delivers a form of naturalism of the situation. We see one rationality confronting another rationality. One emotional intelligence against the other. The mayor’s exchange with the young motorcyclist, which takes place in the neighborhood in a framework of benevolence, devoid of any kind of condescension, opens up the field of possibilities. Not to mention this fascinating scene that literally makes us melt with tenderness in front of this little girl who looks at herself in the mirror in the closet of her bedroom and imitates these big guys in town. “Brouuuuh, brouuuuh, brouuuuh! »


Adrenaline, an immersive film about cross-bitumen and more, by Nadir Ioulain
Adrenaline, an immersive film about cross-bitumen and more, by Nadir Ioulain

Nadir Ioulain, with great talent, brings us to the crossroads where the paths between fiction, documentary and learning history cross each other. This instructor, who teaches young motorcyclists and explains to them the chameleon school taught by the guide Amadou Hampâté Bâ.

Decor also made of concrete, which is associated with plans for abandoned wilderness, where the wild nature takes back all its rights, which basically despises all these urban planners, who are well fattened by the various urban renewal operations in decades of politics in the city.

As we come out of the white tent, we meet two of the comedians. Nadir throws a teasing air at them: “Hi guys, this is the CEO of Saphirnews.” Answer in the heart: “No, Saphirnews has come all the way! » In our head there is inflammation in the synapses: “Damn, are we so gentrified? They will end up insulting us with left tajine, these idiots.” Except we wanted to be Cinderella and eat olives from the tajine just before midnight.

Then comes to mind a pretty bloody series aired on Netflix called The platform. The story has the context of a prison verticality over a hundred floors. The more we go down, the more misery it is. Maybe yes, we are on different floors, but nothing to do with the top floor of the Fondation de l’islam de France (FIF) and its annual budget of 700,000 euros. We also understand that well “mean” for a cultural fund. Always a matter of flooring! And in The platform, we can tumble even lower or higher. But reality is often dirtier than fiction.

But let’s be optimistic! Fortunately, the ongoing digital revolution is giving residents of working-class neighborhoods the means to free themselves from miserable material conditions. Provided, of course, to encounter benevolent guides who accompany us towards knowledge and especially towards truly operational economic circuits. Nadir, congratulations to the artist!

Mohammad Collin


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