What are we going to read this summer? Editorial fiction

Our test suggestions can be found at this link.

Giuliano Da Empoli, The Magus of the Kremlin, Gallimard, 2022

Normally you have already read it, but if you have not read it yet, read it. -Gilles Gressani

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Javier Cercas, Terra Alta, 3. El Castillo de Barbazul (Terra Alta, 3. Bluebeard’s Castle)Tusquets Editors, March 2022

By the exit ofIndependence, Melchor finally got revenge. With this new volume, Javier Cercas asks a question that Dumas had not fully answered Monte Cristo : how an avenger lives after touching the target. “Subtly and ingeniously disguised as a fairy tale, Castillo de Barbazul reveals the series Terra Alta for what it is: Javier Cercas’ most ambitious literary project “. – Baptiste Roger-Lacan

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Maylis de Kerangal and Joy Sorman, SeyvozIncluded Editions, 2022

The Anthropocene devoured the landscapes, and the memory of those landscapes swallowed us up alternately, sometimes brutally. Short but ambitious, close to the new imagination, Seyvoz is the story of the past and present of a disaster – the flood programmed in 1952 by old Tignes under the Chevril dam – and Tomi Motz’s four days as an exploratory dive, in pieces, of human life under water from an artificial lake. – Matheo Malik

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Vesna Goldsworthy, Iron carpetChatto & Windus Editions2022

What does it mean to grow beyond a boundary as suffocating as the Iron Curtain, and which suddenly – at least apparently – disappears? We lose the use of words to talk about what formed us. It is not known how to talk to those who were separated. Vesna Goldsworthy is writing a very enjoyable book to read, which is part of the new wave of memories and self-fiction (we can think of Lea Ypi, Available ; Oana Lohan, Little Mars), who try to tell this story without anger or nostalgia. A concrete experience that makes us wiser. – Ramona Bloj

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Fabio Baca, NewAdelphi2022

Here is a novel written in a dense and sophisticated language about the most intolerable betrayal that exists, our brain, and at the same time a key to trying to understand the madness and the violence that arises in whatever form in the improvisations of the world to ridicule that. – Andrea Marcolongo

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Annie Ernaux, The young manGallimard, 2022

“Often I have loved to force myself to write”: this is the very first sentence in Young man by Annie Ernaux. In a few pages (37 in total) the author tells about his relationship with a man who is thirty years younger than her. It is, of course, about love, but also about a deep reflection on the passage of time and mixing experiences that have already been lived. Through her aging body next to her young lover, Annie Ernaux gives us a very close story of life and authorship. For if one does not write them, things have not come to an end, they are only experienced. – Andrea Marcolongo

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Carlos Fonseca, South2022

In the tradition of Horacio Castellano’s Moya and Roberto Bolaño, Carlos Fonseca is one of the great writers who manages to report on the global experience from a Latin American perspective. —Florent Zemmouche

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Katerina Poladjan, Future musicFischer Verlag, 2022

IN The sound of the future, Katerina Poladjan paints a portrait of Russian society just before the Gorbachev era. The sound of the future is already in the air, but for now, life continues in a middle ground, sometimes comical, sometimes tragic. – Katia Petrovic

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Jon Kalman Stefansson, Your absence is only darkness (novel translated from Icelandic by Eric Boury), Grasset, 2022

“What we live, what we invent” is one of the first aphorisms, sometimes crazy, sometimes philosophical, that characterizes Stefansson’s novel. The narrator no longer knows if he is dreaming, if he is already dead, or if he has just lost his memory. A host of characters go by virtue of their history to trace a bustling family fresco through the ages. This novel with rare vitality takes us into an intense romantic whirlwind: a playlist of jazz, rock and blues divided from father to son; stories of love and exile, of trials and sorrows, of trips through the Icelandic fjords … “What escapes our understanding makes the world bigger”. – Guarantee Mazelier

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Marica Bodrozic, The work of birdsLuchterhand, 2022

The author perceives, notes, remembers, discovers a number of elements and signs: “the stenograms of the soul,” reminiscent of the “stenograms of dreams,” as Walter Benjamin once mentioned. Perhaps only the birds are able to perceive the invisible joints. This is their job, this is “the work of birds”. – Emmanuelle Terrones

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Clelia Anfray, MetropolisMercury of France2022

Joseph and Marion are two characters that everything is against. The first one, who is in his thirties, puts up posters in the Paris’ metro, languishes in an everyday life that seems to give him few perspectives, which makes him question his place in society. Marion, on the other hand, is a brilliant young woman to whom everything seems to smile. After a secret encounter on a subway platform that occupies Joseph, his quest to find Marion takes him to discover the mysterious Metropolis, a dystopian project that mixes neuroscience and marketing, which the two protagonists discover in turn. – Marin Saillofest

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Eva Baltasar, MamutLiterature Random House, 2022

When European and world news seem to impose new aesthetic explorations outside the beaten path of autofiction, novels like Baltasars offer a return to a rich tradition, while having a great deal of contemporaneity. It is a movement that no longer seeks promised lands or lost paradises, but emphasizes enchantment and loneliness. – Felix Terrones

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Tonino Benacquista, Porca MiseriaGallimard, 2022

“Artisan of Fiction,” as he calls himself, Tonino Benacquista finally writes in the first person. The author takes up a classic subject and Italianizes his childhood suburb of Paris, Vitry-sur-Seine. More interested in comics than in Balzac, who spoke Italian with depressed parents, it was paradoxically written that he learned French, France (“it’s my home”), literature, and soon screenwriting. This will give him a César, which will remind him of his father’s first name. A simple, honest account of the early calling of a 60-year-old immigrant writer – Olivier Lenoir

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Isabel Bono, Los secondaryTusquets, 2022

Los SecundariosIsabel Bono’s latest novel, published by Tusquets, delves into the complexities of modern life, loneliness and resentment through the story of two lonely characters who are at an age of maturity – Lucía Tolosa

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Find all our selections here.

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